Menu
Your Cart

 more Thai Pads , fundamental gis, and journey gis will be restocked by the end of january we hope

What's My Name? on dark

What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
What's My Name? on dark
$29.99
  • Stock: In Stock
  • Model: 39568655
  • Weight: 0.30kg
  • Dimensions: 30.00cm x 20.00cm x 4.00cm

Available Options

When Muhammad Ali stepped into the ring to face Ernie Terrell in 1967, he was already fighting on two fronts - one against his opponent, and the other against the US government and the public opinion over his refusal to be drafted into the Vietnam War. But what made Ali so mad at Terrell went beyond the boundaries of the boxing ring, and it had to do with something that was much more personal and meaningful to him.

You see, Ernie Terrell had refused to call Muhammad Ali by his chosen name, instead insisting on referring to him as Cassius Clay, his birth name. To Ali, this was not just a matter of respect or preference - it was a matter of identity and pride. By using his birth name, Terrell was denying Ali's right to define himself and to choose his own path in life.

As the fight progressed, Ali became increasingly frustrated and angry with Terrell's refusal to acknowledge his chosen name. He taunted him with jabs and hooks, all the while repeating the phrase "What's my name?" over and over again. It was a way of demanding respect and recognition, a way of asserting his identity and his right to be heard.

For Ali, the fight with Terrell was more than just a physical battle - it was a symbolic one. It was a way of standing up against the forces of oppression and prejudice, a way of fighting for the right to be who he was and to live his life on his own terms. And when he emerged victorious, it was a triumph not just for himself, but for everyone who had ever faced discrimination or marginalization.

So yes, Muhammad Ali was mad at Ernie Terrell - but his anger was not just about a petty squabble over names. It was about something much bigger and much more important than that - it was about the fight for freedom and the right to be oneself, no matter the cost.

Write a review

Note: HTML is not translated!
Bad Good
Captcha